Art Hub

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The Honesty of Saint Eligius, 1614Jacopo da Empoli (1551 – 1640), Italian Jacopo da Empoli lived and worked in Florence all his life, he followed Santi di Tito in the return to the clarity of the Florentine High Renaissance. He absorbed the ideas of his more innovative contemporaries and became one of the most popular painters of altarpieces for churches in Florence and Tuscany. He was also a distinguished still-life painter and received many commissions from private patrons, among them the Medici. — at Galleria degli Uffizi.

The Honesty of Saint Eligius, 1614
Jacopo da Empoli (1551 – 1640), Italian 

Jacopo da Empoli lived and worked in Florence all his life, he followed Santi di Tito in the return to the clarity of the Florentine High Renaissance. He absorbed the ideas of his more innovative contemporaries and became one of the most popular painters of altarpieces for churches in Florence and Tuscany. He was also a distinguished still-life painter and received many commissions from private patrons, among them the Medici. — at Galleria degli Uffizi.

Sunset at Etretat, 1875George Inness (1825 – 1894), American "If I can put one touch of rosy sunset into the life of any man or woman, I shall feel that I have worked with God." (Gilbert Keith Chesterton) — at The Private Collection .

Sunset at Etretat, 1875
George Inness (1825 – 1894), American 

"If I can put one touch of rosy sunset into the life of any man or woman, I shall feel that I have worked with God." (Gilbert Keith Chesterton) — at The Private Collection .

Harvesting at Windsor, 1795Benjamin West (1738 – 1820), American Benjamin West painted this picture from a series of sketches he made near Windsor Castle in 1795. The principal residence of the British monarch, the castle is visible on the distant horizon. After West’s death the painting was sold by his sons in a major studio sale of their father’s paintings. In the catalogue of the sale it was revealed that the group in the right middle ground are friends of the artist and may include a self-portrait in the figure at the extreme right. — at Royal Academy of Arts.

Harvesting at Windsor, 1795
Benjamin West (1738 – 1820), American 

Benjamin West painted this picture from a series of sketches he made near Windsor Castle in 1795. The principal residence of the British monarch, the castle is visible on the distant horizon. After West’s death the painting was sold by his sons in a major studio sale of their father’s paintings. In the catalogue of the sale it was revealed that the group in the right middle ground are friends of the artist and may include a self-portrait in the figure at the extreme right. — at Royal Academy of Arts.

David and Jonathan, between 1505 and 1510Cima da Conegliano (1460 – 1518), Italian After David had slain the giant Goliath, Jonathan became his devoted friend. David is represented holding the head of Goliath and Jonathan holds a javelin. The weapon is perhaps the one used by Jonathan’s father, King Saul, when he tried to strike David. He later used it against Jonathan who had attempted to intervene on David’s behalf. — at National Gallery.

David and Jonathan, between 1505 and 1510
Cima da Conegliano (1460 – 1518), Italian 

After David had slain the giant Goliath, Jonathan became his devoted friend. David is represented holding the head of Goliath and Jonathan holds a javelin. The weapon is perhaps the one used by Jonathan’s father, King Saul, when he tried to strike David. He later used it against Jonathan who had attempted to intervene on David’s behalf. — at National Gallery.

Aurora Borealis, 1865Frederic Edwin Church (1826 – 1900), American "The stars are putting on their glittering belts.They throw around their shoulders cloaks that flash Like a great shadow’s last embellishment.” (Wallace Stevens) — at Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery.

Aurora Borealis, 1865
Frederic Edwin Church (1826 – 1900), American 

"The stars are putting on their glittering belts.
They throw around their shoulders cloaks that flash 
Like a great shadow’s last embellishment.” (Wallace Stevens) — at Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery.

The Victory, 1902Phoebe Anna Traquair (1852 – 1936), Irish Phoebe Anna Traquair was an Irish artist who rose to prominence in Edinburgh and went on to produce a staggering volume of work. She was part of the Arts and Crafts movements in Scotland and worked in a number of disciplines including embroidery, jewellery making and metal work, painting, illustration and book design. She painted vast murals in several buildings including the Catholic Apostolic Church and the chapel of the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, both in Edinburgh. — at National Galleries of Scotland.

The Victory, 1902
Phoebe Anna Traquair (1852 – 1936), Irish 

Phoebe Anna Traquair was an Irish artist who rose to prominence in Edinburgh and went on to produce a staggering volume of work. She was part of the Arts and Crafts movements in Scotland and worked in a number of disciplines including embroidery, jewellery making and metal work, painting, illustration and book design. She painted vast murals in several buildings including the Catholic Apostolic Church and the chapel of the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, both in Edinburgh. — at National Galleries of Scotland.

Battle Scene from the Comic Fantastic Opera “The Seafarer”, 1923Paul Klee (1879 – 1940), Swiss "My mirror probes down to the heart. I write words on the forehead and around the corners of the mouth. My human faces are truer than the real ones." The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898-1918 — at Kunstmuseum Basel.

Battle Scene from the Comic Fantastic Opera “The Seafarer”, 1923
Paul Klee (1879 – 1940), Swiss 

"My mirror probes down to the heart. I write words on the forehead and around the corners of the mouth. My human faces are truer than the real ones." The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898-1918 — at Kunstmuseum Basel.

The Lamentations of Mary Magdalene on the body of Christ, 1867Arnold Böcklin (1827 – 1901), Swiss Influenced by Romanticism, Böcklin’s painting is symbolist with mythological subjects often overlapping with the Pre-Raphaelites. His pictures portray mythological, fantastical figures along classical architecture constructions (often revealing an obsession with death) creating a strange, fantasy world. — at Kunstmuseum Basel.
 


The Lamentations of Mary Magdalene on the body of Christ, 1867
Arnold Böcklin (1827 – 1901), Swiss 

Influenced by Romanticism, Böcklin’s painting is symbolist with mythological subjects often overlapping with the Pre-Raphaelites. His pictures portray mythological, fantastical figures along classical architecture constructions (often revealing an obsession with death) creating a strange, fantasy world. — at Kunstmuseum Basel.

 

Lake Thun, Symmetric Reflection, 1905Ferdinand Hodler (1853 – 1918), Swiss "Beauty is eternity gazing at itself in a mirror. But you are the eternity and you are the mirror.” (Khalil Gibran)— at Musées d’art et d’histoire de Genève.
 

Lake Thun, Symmetric Reflection, 1905
Ferdinand Hodler (1853 – 1918), Swiss 

"Beauty is eternity gazing at itself in a mirror. 
But you are the eternity and you are the mirror.” (Khalil Gibran)— at Musées d’art et d’histoire de Genève.

 

The Nightmare, 1781 Henry Fuseli (1741 – 1825), Swiss This painting created a sensation when it was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1782. The canvas seems to portray simultaneously a dreaming woman and the subject of her nightmare. The work was likely inspired by folkloric Germanic tales about demons and witches that possessed people who slept alone. In these stories, men were visited by horses or hags and women were believed to engage in sexual relationship with the devil. — at Detroit Institute of Arts.

The Nightmare, 1781 
Henry Fuseli (1741 – 1825), Swiss 

This painting created a sensation when it was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1782. The canvas seems to portray simultaneously a dreaming woman and the subject of her nightmare. The work was likely inspired by folkloric Germanic tales about demons and witches that possessed people who slept alone. In these stories, men were visited by horses or hags and women were believed to engage in sexual relationship with the devil. — at Detroit Institute of Arts.